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Review by Riley

About Jumper’s Hope

Reunited lovers must outwit a ruthless government agent, or their rumored deaths will be real this time. Two retired elite special forces veterans discover their battles aren’t behind them after all. Someone considers them loose ends, and will stop at nothing to erase their knowledge of a secret government project. Their service left them both with wounds that will never heal. Do they still have what it takes to survive?

Kerzanna Nevarr’s elite special forces days of wearing Jumper mech suits and piloting Citizen Protection Services’ ships are long gone. The dark legacy of her service forced her to learn to live a quiet life. And she had to do so alone, without the lover who died before her eyes.

Jess Orowitz, veteran of CPS’s secret spy organization, Kameleon Corps, made the mistake of trusting his superiors. He’s paid a horrific price—fractured memories, constant headaches, and the death of the only woman he ever loved. Retirement on a quiet farming planet has kept him in an emotional deep freeze, but safe.

But now, Kerzanna is being hunted for reasons she can’t guess, and even more stunning, the man who helps her escape is Jess, her supposedly dead lover. For Jess, discovering Kerzanna is still alive is only the first of the lies and betrayal he uncovers.

Worst of all, their hunter is someone with CPS intel and lethal resources. Someone who believes the only obstacles standing in the way of success are one broken-down ex-Jumper and a fractured Kameleon.

Together, are they strong enough to escape death one more time?

 

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Review of Jumper’s Hope

I would call the Central Galactic Concordance series hard scifi with a strong romantic element.  I doubt my definition of ‘hard’ scifi agrees with everyone, or anyone.  But the elements of futuristic, highly developed worlds, developing worlds, humans scattered ‘out there’, technology (including space travel) that has not been invented except in an author’s mind, and complex social and political structures that support all the above play into my definition.  There are many scifi romance authors that incorporate some or all of the elements I mentioned, but few build their universes so completely and effectively as Carol Van Natta has in her Central Galactic Concordance series.

Carol’s addition to her universe is the group of people known as Minders.  Those that have special, though not unique psychic abilities.  Abilities used for good.  Abilities used for evil.

It is the good and evil uses of these abilities that form the stories in this series.

Jumper’s Hope brings back the ultimate evil, Dixon Davidro, that made me shiver when I read Pico’s Crush.  To say that Davidro is a bad guy is putting it mildly.  He is power-hungry and will use all the despicable, horrible means he can to achieve his goals.

Kerzanna and Jess may be obstacles to those goals.  You can see where this is going.  There is a showdown coming.

But there will be a lot of events before that showdown.  One of Davidro’s former ‘pets’, Nevarr,  initiates a series of those events that will have Kerzanna and Jess on the run, on the chase and everything in-between.

Action, intrigue, and, of course, romance.  Kerzanna and Jess met many years ago.  That is when the romance began.  But each thought the other was dead.  Their reunion is complicated by threats on Kerzanna’s life and a need to find a safe place to run to.  The fact that this couple didn’t just meet means that the romance between them is anything but typical.  I enjoyed watching them get reacquainted as well as learning so many new things about each other.  These are two very different people.  At first I wasn’t even sure they belonged together.  (It’s a romance though – they do belong together.)

Here are a few more few things that raise my opinion of this book to 5 stars:

  1. Kerzanna is a retired jumper with a body that is slowly deteriorating. I appreciate mature characters and I can sympathize with the body aches.  Not because I was a jumper, but anyone of a certain age understands what I am talking about.  Beats those heroine’s that are perfectly formed 20-somethings with no real life experience.
  2. There are descriptions of the ship that Kerzanna and Jess travelled on.  It seemed so real.  Is Ms. Van Natta a rocket scientist?  Okay, I really have no clue about what space ships should be like, despite my years of watching Star Trek, but I was so convinced.
  3. Jess, in addition to being a Kameleon, is a hacker extraordinaire – this talent comes in really handy many times over.  Actually I was so amazed at his talent that I thought it was a little over the top, but at the same time, I was glad Kerzanna and Jess had the hacker talent as a resource.
  4. Evil Davidro.  Yes, he creeps me out. But the juxtaposition of someone so evil against the rest of the universe makes me appreciate the rest of the universe.  We don’t all have to be saints!
  5. The Ayorinn prophecy. This prophecy has been mentioned in previous books in this series, but never so much.  Jumper’s Hope advances the Ayorinn prophecy angle.  We learn a bit more about it, but not really enough.
  6. Cats, two of them.  They are traveling companions on the space ship I previously mentioned.  Any scifi story is enhanced by cats.  Am I right?

Jumper’s Hope is top-notch scifi adventure and romance.  Plenty of intriguing story lines carried about by fascinating, complex characters.  I definitely recommend Jumper’s Hope!

If you are new to the Central Galactic Concordance, I recommend reading the earlier books in the series, in order.  Another recommendation: the author’s website with detailed information on Minders and the Central Galactic Concordance Civilization: http://author.carolvannatta.com/extras-for-readers/.

The author provided a copy of her book so I could bring you this review.

 

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Links

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